What is the Raspberry Pi you may ask?

Well, the Raspberry Pi is a small inexpensive computer ($35) which was designed by Eben Upton and built in England to be used for educational purposes. When you purchase the Raspberry Pi it comes as a board with all components visible and no case, its size is a little bit bigger than a credit card.  However, the little computers’ popularity has really taken hold and now not only school children are using it but there are now hobbyists around the world  getting on board with the Pi. From schoolchildren using the Raspberry Pi to learn how to program to people building all sorts of projects including a dog feeder, a tablet and a time lapse camera. I am completely blown away by the projects that users are coming up with.

As users can pick up the Pi for a great price,  it does mean that if for whatever reason it breaks it is not an expensive outlay of money for another one. This is obviously not ideal but compare it to other computer prices and you can see that it is a benefit of the Pi. However if you do not want to make any projects and instead use the Pi as a normal computer you can do just that, as there are many operating systems ready and waiting for you to download. One program that is particularly useful for learning programming is ‘Scratch’ which is a drag and drop image based python programming language. Scratch makes it incredibly easy for programming beginners to start understanding the basics. Scratch is available via the Noobs (great OS for a beginner) http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/tag/noobs or Raspbian (http://www.raspbian.org/) and other OS’s.

I think that the Raspberry Pi is a fantastic product and I am in awe of what the team have achieved by building it. There are so many projects out there that I can’t stop reading through all of them and trying to figure out which one to try next!

The Raspberry Pi comes in two models, specifications are below:

Raspberry Pi comes in two models, specifications are below:

Model A:

  • Chip: Broadcom BCM2835 SoC full HD multimedia applications processor
  • CPU: 700 MHz Low Power ARM1176JZ-F Applications Processor
  • GPU: Dual Core VideoCore IV Multimedia Co-Processor
  • Memory: 256 SDRAM
  • Ethernet: Not Available
  • USB 2.0: Single USB Connector
  • Video Output: HDMI (Rev 1.3 and 1.4), Composite RCA (PAL & NTSC)
  • Audio Output: 3.5mm jack
  • Onboard Storage: SD, MMC, SDIO card slot
  • Operating System: Linux
  • Dimensions: 8cm x  54cm x 1.5cm

Model B:

  • Chip: Broadcom BCM2835 SoC full HD multimedia applications processor
  • CPU: 700 MHz Low Power ARM1176JZ-F Applications Processor
  • GPU: Dual Core VideoCore IV Multimedia Co-Processor
  • Memory: 512 SDRAM
  • Ethernet: Onboard 10/100 Ethernet RJ45 jack
  • USB 2.0: Dual USB Connector
  • Video Output: HDMI (Rev 1.3 and 1.4), Composite RCA (PAL & NTSC)
  • Audio Output: 3.5mm jack
  • Onboard Storage: SD, MMC, SDIO card slot
  • Operating System: Linux
  • Dimensions:  8cm x 54cm x 1.7cm

I bought the Model B (in image below) as I wanted to be sure that I had the most powerful version and can make any project that I like that I see on the internet. The Model A is great but is more suitable for lower powered projects.

Raspberry Pi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some of the Raspberry Pi projects that I am going to try!

Webserver:

http://www.jeremymorgan.com/tutorials/raspberry-pi/how-to-raspberry-pi-web-server/

Raspberry Pi Media Centre:

Raspbmc

http://www.raspbmc.com/

or

OpenElec

http://openelec.tv/get-openelec/viewcategory/10-raspberry-pi-builds

And here is the tablet project that I was mentioning earlier:

http://mkcastor.com/2014/01/02/pipad-build/

I can’t believe how good this looks. However, I think I am little way off from building this!

Raspberry Pi Official Site (where you can find everything about the Raspberry Pi)

http://www.raspberrypi.org/

If there are Raspberry Pi projects out there that you like, please add the link in the comments below!